College members killed in 1916

Stephen Frederick Green (?-1916)

Stephen Frederick Green was a member of staff at Worcester College in the early twentieth century, however there are very few records relating to staff in the College Archives and we do not hold any information on his time with the College.  Private Stephen Green was drowned at sea on 8 January 1916 when the troopship he was sailing on, the SS Citta di Palermo, was sunk by a mine off the coast of Brindisi.

Unfortunately the College has no photographs of Stephen Frederick Green.

Henry Umfreville Wilkinson (1890-1916)

Harry Wilkinson matriculated in 1908; he was the younger brother of Cyril Wilkinson (Fellow and Dean 1919-1958) and Rothes Wilkinson (killed in action in 1914).  Following his graduation Harry Wilkinson became an Assistant District Commissioner in Mlanje, Nyasaland (Malawi) and joined the King’s African Rifles in 1914.  He died suddenly of typhoid fever at Mlanje on 17 March 1916.

Photograph from the papers of Sir John Masterman.

Thomas Storey Inglis Hall (c1885-1916)

Thomas Hall matriculated in 1903.  After enlisting in November 1914, Thomas Hall served with the King’s Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster) in Mesopotamia.  Second Lieutenant Thomas Hall was killed in action at the Battle of Sannaiyat on 9 April 1916.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his wife.

John Gurth Morgan-Owen (1884-1916)

Gurth Morgan-Owen came to Worcester College as an Exhibitioner from Bromsgrove School in 1902 and graduated in 1904.  After graduation he was a school master at St George’s College, Quilmes, Buenos Aires, until his return to Britain to take a commission in February 1915.  He served in Egypt and Mesopotamia, where he was mentioned in dispatches.  Second Lieutenant Gurth Morgan-Owen was killed in action at the Battle of Sannaiyat on 9 April 1916.

Unfortunately the College has no photographs of Gurth Morgan-Owen.

Oliffe Richmond Nicholas (1882-1916)

Oliffe Nicholas entered Worcester College in 1902 and achieved second class honours in Jurisprudence in 1906.  He attended Lincoln’s Inn and was called to the Bar, taking the BCL degree in 1910.  After practising for some time he returned to Oxford and was occupied with teaching law until the outbreak of war.  He received his commission in August 1914 and was promoted to Lieutenant in April 1915.  Lieutenant Oliffe Nicholas was killed in action on 18 April 1916 in Mesopotamia.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his family.

Yvo Lempriere Ellis (1894-1916)

Yvo Ellis was born in Southampton and attended Rossall School in Lancashire where he won a scholarship in 1908.  He entered Worcester College in October 1913 as a classical scholar, but the following year he applied for a commission on the outbreak of the First World War.  Yvo Ellis’ service commenced in October 1914 and he joined the 13th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment which in 1915 was stationed on the Isle of Wight.  In April 1916 the regiment was sent to France and Lieutenant Yvo Ellis was subsequently killed in action near Bethune on 29 May 1916.

I am grateful to Patrick Ellis, nephew of Yvo Lempriere Ellis, for providing further information and a photograph of his uncle.

Rev Cecil Wykeham Lydall (1873-1916)

Cecil Lydall matriculated in 1892 as a Classical Exhibitioner and achieved third class honours in Classics in 1896.  At the outbreak of war in 1914 he was already serving as a Chaplain in the Royal Navy and at the time of his death was Chaplain on Sir David Beatty’s flagship, HMS Lion.  The Reverend Cecil Lydall was killed in action in the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916, five days before he was to have been married.

Unfortunately the College has no photographs of Cecil Lydall.

Richard Greaves Tasker (1888-1916)

Richard Tasker came to Worcester College from Bromsgrove School as a Cookes Scholar in 1908, and achieved third class honours in Classical Moderations in Jurisprudence in 1912.  While up at Worcester he played in the College Rugby Football XV.  In 1914 he was a student of the Inner Temple, and was about to be called to the Bar when war broke out.  He applied for a commission and was gazetted to the Worcestershire Regiment.  In January 1915 he married Vera Everett, and went to the front the following July.  Captain Richard Tasker was killed in action at La Boisselle on 3 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his wife, Vera Tasker.

William Eddowes Green (1895-1916)

William Green was educated privately and passed the Worcester College entrance examination in June 1914, intending to matriculate in the following October.  However on the outbreak of war he joined the Dorset Regiment, denying himself the opportunity to come into residence, and was sent to the front in July 1915.  Captain William Green died on 6 July 1916 of wounds received 1 July 1916 in the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his father, Herbert Green.

Guy Danvers Mainwaring Crossman (1885-1916)

Guy Crossman was born in 1885, the younger son of the Reverend Charles Danvers Crossman who had been a Cookes Fellow of the College from 1874-1876.  Guy Crossman matriculated in 1904 and achieved third class honours in Literae Humaniores in 1908.  Following his graduation Crossman was a schoolmaster until October 1914 when he enlisted and obtained a commission in the Welsh Regiment.  Second Lieutenant Guy Crossman was killed in action at Mametz Wood on 10 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Unfortunately the College has no photographs of Guy Crossman.

Edward de Quincey Mears (1892-1916)

Edward Mears was educated at Milton Abbas Grammar School and at Llandovery College before he was awarded an Eaton Scholarship in Classics at Worcester College in 1911.  He took second class honours in Classical Moderations in 1913 and was a member of the University Officer Training Corps during his time at Oxford.  He enlisted in September 1914 and was given a commission in the 10th Battalion of the Essex Regiment in December of that year.  After seven months at the front he took part in the first day of the Battle of the Somme (1 July 1916) when his platoon captured the German position allotted to them.  Second Lieutenant Edward Mears was killed in action at Trônes Wood on 14 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his father, Edward Mears.

Frederick Walton Golightly (1890-1916)

Frederick Golightly was born at Graaff-Reinet, South Africa in 1890 and took his first BA at Cape University in 1910.  He entered Worcester College in 1911 as a Rhodes Scholar and achieved first class honours in Engineering in 1913.  During his time at Oxford he played hockey for the College and was a keen boxer.  Frederick Golightly was appointed a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics at Victoria College, Stellenbosch, but at the outbreak of war he resigned the post in order to enlist in the South African Heavy Artillery and sailed for England with their first contingent on 28 August 1915.  Gunner Frederick Golightly was killed in action near Thiepval on 21 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Unfortunately the College has no photographs of Frederick Golightly.

Edmund Downes Badcock (1893-1916)

Edmund Badcock was educated at Radley College before coming up to Worcester College in 1912, where he studied history and rowed in the College Eight in 1913 and 1914.  His sister Lucy wrote after his death that “Edmund was interested in and enthusiastic for everything concerning Worcester College, where he was very happy for his two years of residence”.  He was a member of the Oxford University Officer Training Corps and took a commission in August 1914, serving with the 1st Battalion of the Northamptonshire Regiment in France.  Lieutenant Edmund Badcock was killed in action near Contalmaison on 22 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. 

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by the family of Edmund Badcock.

Alexander Bell Duncan (1885-1916)

Alexander Duncan came up to Worcester in 1903 as a Classical Exhibitioner and achieved third class honours in Literae Humaniores in 1907.  Following his graduation he entered the Indian Civil Service and at an early stage of the First World War he obtained a commission in the Indian Cavalry.  Second Lieutenant Alexander Duncan died on 5 August 1916 of wounds received on the border with Baluchistan.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his brother, W. O. Duncan.

Charles Fabian Saunders (1895-1916)

Charles Fabian Saunders matriculated in 1913 and joined the University Officer Training Corps during his time at the College.  He enlisted at the outbreak of the war and obtained a commission with the Northamptonshire Regiment.  During his time at the Officers’ Training School in Oxford he distinguished himself as a runner at two inter-regimental sports meetings.  Second Lieutenant Charles Saunders served at Loos in 1915 where he was wounded by shrapnel, and had only returned to the Front on 13 July 1916 before he was killed in action at Guillemont on 18 August 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

I am grateful to Max Garrety, great-nephew of Charles Saunders, for providing the photograph.

Charles Robert Crighton Maltby (1890-1916)

Charles Maltby was born in Nottingham is 1890 and was a Chorister at Magdalen College School in Oxford between 1901 and 1906.  He was awarded a Minor Scholarship in Classics to Worcester College in 1909, where he rowed in the Torpid and Eight and was a member of the Buskins.  Intent on a career as a professional actor, Charles Maltby was a member of OUDS and spent much of his time at Worcester focused on theatrical productions, as a consequence of which he was sent down in Hilary Term 1912.  At the outbreak of the war he was working as an actor in London and enlisted as a private in one of the Public Schools Battalions in 1914.  After an Officer Training Course in Oxford Lieutenant Charles Maltby served in France and Belgium from July 1915 until his death on 26 August 1916 from wounds received near Guillemont during the Battle of the Somme. 

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his father, Charles Maltby.

George Geoffrey Edgar (1893-1916)

George Edgar was educated at Charterhouse and came to Worcester College in 1912, where he was a member of the Oxford University Officer Training Corps.  His service commenced on 24 November 1914 and he served with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps in France for over twelve months.  Second Lieutenant George Edgar died on 28 August 1916 of wounds received in action at Delville Wood during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his mother, Jane Edgar.

Reginald Rogers (1882-1916)

Reginald Rogers matriculated at Worcester College as an Exhibtioner and achieved third class honours in Literae Humaniores in 1905.  While at Oxford he was goalkeeper for the University Association Football XI in 1904 and 1905.  After graduation he became a schoolmaster, but volunteered for service in 1915.  Second Lieutenant Reginald Rogers was killed in action at Flers on 15 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his family.

Arthur Paston Mack (1863-1916)

Arthur Mack was educated at Bradfield College before entering Worcester College in 1881.  He served for some years in the Suffolk Militia, retiring as Captain in 1886.  He subsequently became an explorer of the desert in Egypt.  On the outbreak of war he volunteered for service and obtained a commission as Captain in the Suffolk Regiment in September 1914; he was twice mentioned in dispatches in 1916.  Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Mack was killed in action near Ginchy on 15 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his wife, Laura Mack.

John Forbes Feild (1892-1916)

John Feild was born to British parents in Saint Petersburg in 1892, and was educated at Haileybury before entering Worcester College in 1911.  He joined the Oxford University Officer Training Corps in October 1914 and later that year obtained a commission in the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry.  Second Lieutenant John Feild was killed in action near Gueudecourt on 16 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his family.

Jasper George Olivier (1896-1916)

Jasper Olivier was educated at Rossall School and elected to an Exhibition at Worcester College in December 1914.  Before coming in to residence he obtained a commission in the East Lancashire Regiment and joined them in January 1915; he transferred into the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry in February 1916.  Second Lieutenant Jasper Olivier was sent to France on 8 September 1916 and killed in action near Albert on the 19 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his father, Henry Olivier.

Maurice Leonard Pearce (1893-1916)

Maurice Pearce came up to Worcester College in 1911 and rowed in the College Torpid and Eight in 1913.  His service commenced on 18 November 1914 and he served first in France and then in Salonika from 1915.  Lieutenant and Adjutant Maurice Pearce was reported missing, presumed killed in action at Salonika on 24 September 1916; his family received confirmation of his death in November 1917.

Unfortunately the College has no photographs of Maurice Pearce.

Nevil William Curran (1893-1916)

Nevil Curran was born in 1893 and entered Worcester College in 1911.  He was gazetted to the 5th Dragoon Guards in August 1914 and served with that regiment at the front from October 1914 until May 1916 when he volunteered for the infantry and joined the Royal Irish Regiment.  During his time at the front Nevil Curran was cited in the French Army Order of 3 March 1915 and awarded the Croix de Guerre; he received the Military Cross on 15 April 1915 for reconnaissance under fire, and was mentioned in dispatches.  Lieutenant Nevil Curran was killed on reconnaissance patrol close to the enemy trenches near Ploegsteert on 4 October 1916.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his father, J. P. Curran.

Ernest Gordon Maufe (1885-1916)

Ernest Maufe was educated at Bradford Grammar School and entered Worcester College in 1903.  He enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers in May 1916 and was transferred to the Royal West Kent Regiment and sent to France in August that year.  Private Ernest Maufe was killed in action at Le Sars on 6 October 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his family.

Eric Smith (c1888-1916)

Eric Smith entered the College in 1906 and, following his graduation, became Sports Master at West Buckland School in North Devon.  On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion attached to the Royal Fusiliers and served in France.  In April 1916 he was recommended for a commission and was gazetted to the Royal West Kent Regiment, returning to the front on 18 September 1916.  Second Lieutenant Eric Smith died from heart failure following an attack of acute jaundice on 15 October 1916, while on active duty in France.

Photograph of Eric Smith chosen for the remembrance volume by his sister, H. Smith.

William Elmhirst (1892-1916)

William Elmhirst matriculated in 1911 and achieved third class honours in Jurisprudence in 1914.  The diary he kept of his freshman year (published in 1969) indicates how he threw himself into college life, joining a large number of clubs, rowing in the College Eight, and joining the Oxford University Officer Training Corps.  Captain William Elmhirst served with the East Yorkshire Regiment from December 1914 until he was killed in action at Serres on 13 November 1916 during the Battle of the Somme.

Photograph chosen for the remembrance volume by his father, W. H. Elmhirst.